Facts about John Masefield England Flag

Summary

John Masefield (born as John Edward Masefield in Ledbury, Herefordshire England) was a famous Poet from England, who lived between June 1, 1878 and May 12, 1967. He became 88 years old.

Biography

John Edward Masefield was an English poet and writer, and Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1930 until his death in 1967. He is remembered as the author of the classic children's novels The Midnight Folk and The Box of Delights, and poems, including "The Everlasting Mercy" and "Sea-Fever".

Masefields mother died in childbirth at the birth of his sister when he was six years old. His father died a short time later and he was placed with an aunt and uncle. Early on he developed an interest in the beauty of nature and was an avid reader. He attended King's School in Warwick from 1888 to 1891. His aunt urged him to a career at sea, in the hope and expectation that he would lose his reading addiction and a good education would get on board the training ship HMS Warwick. Here he spent several years and he seemed to have enough time to read and listen to the sailor stories. He left this ship in 1894 and signed on the Gilcruix, who undertook a trip to Chile. During this trip he was seriously sick and upon arrival he was hit by a sunstroke. After some time in hospital to have lain, he returned to England. His aunt made sure he went to sea again. After his next trip he stepped ashore in New York City, determined to make something of his life and become a writer. In New York, he led a nomadic life and had various jobs to earn a living. In 1897, he eventually returned to England, where his ambitions to become a writer were solid.

Some of his stories was published in several magazines and in 1898 he got his own column in the Manchester Guardian. His first poems appeared in 1902 under the title Salt-Water Ballads. With a collection of stories and sketches entitled A Mainsail Haul (1905) established his name. Then he published numerous works, including both poetry and plays and children's books. He attracted much attention with The Everlasting Mercy, a long narrative poem that was published in 1911 in The English Review. His everyday language and then somewhat controversial content caused some sensation.

His popularity led him in 1930 was appointed Poet Laureate.
In 1935 he received the Order of Merit by King George V.

John Masefield died on 12 May 1967. He was cremated in accordance with his wishes, his ashes were interred in the Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, London.

Zodiac etc.

He is born under the zodiac gemini, who is known for Communication, Indecision, Inquisitive, Intelligent, Changeable. Our collection contains 11 quotes who is written / told by John.

Related authors: King George V

Source / external links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Masefield

Famous quotes by John Masefield (11)


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"In this life he laughs longest who laughs last"
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"Since the printing press came into being, poetry has ceased to be the delight of the whole community of man; it has become the amusement and delight of the few"
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"Commonplace people dislike tragedy because they dare not suffer and cannot exult"
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"It is too maddening. I've got to fly off, right now, to some devilish navy yard, three hours in a seasick steamer, and after being heartily sick, I'll have to speak three times, and then I'll be sick coming home. Still, who would not be sick for England?"
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"There are few earthly things more beautiful than a university a place where those who hate ignorance may strive to know, where those who perceive truth may strive to make others see"
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"I must go down to the sea again, to the lonely sea and the sky; and all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by"
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"Coming in solemn beauty like slow old tunes of Spain"
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"The luck will alter and the star will rise"
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"Once in a century a man may be ruined or made insufferable by praise. But surely once in a minute something generous dies for want of it"
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"Poetry is a mixture of common sense, which not all have, with an uncommon sense, which very few have"
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"It's a warm wind, the west wind, full of birds' cries"


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