Dr. Seuss Biography

Dr. Seuss, Writer
Attr: Library of Congress, Public domain
Born asTheodor Seuss Geisel
Occup.Writer
FromUSA
SpousesHelen Palmer (1927-1967)
Audrey Stone Dimond (1968)
BornMarch 2, 1904
Springfield, Massachusetts, USA
DiedSeptember 24, 1991
San Diego, California, USA
Aged87 years
Early Life and Education
Theodor Seuss Geisel, known to the world as Dr. Seuss, was born upon March 2, 1904, in Springfield, Massachusetts, USA. He was the boy of Theodor Robert Geisel, a successful brewmaster, and his better half, Henrietta Seuss Geisel. He matured with his sis, Marnie, in a tight-knit, middle-class household with German ancestry.

Geisel went to Springfield's Central High School, where he ended up being editor-in-chief of the school paper. After graduating in 1921, he registered at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. At Dartmouth, he became involved with the college's humor magazine, "The Jack-O-Lantern", and eventually served as its editor-in-chief.

In 1925, Geisel finished from Dartmouth and chose to pursue a career in cartooning and writing. He took courses at the Lincoln College, part of the University of Oxford, in the United Kingdom, intending to make a doctorate in literature. Nevertheless, around 1927, he dropped out of the program to pursue his passion for composing and drawing full-time.

Early Career
After going back to the United States, Geisel started sending his work to numerous magazines, newspapers, and advertising agencies. In 1927, he released his first cartoon under the pen name Seuss in the Saturday Evening Post. He consequently worked as a cartoonist and writer for Judge, a humor publication, where he satisfied and married his very first partner, Helen Palmer in 1927.

In 1937, Geisel published his very first children's book, "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street", which was declined by over 20 publishers prior to being accepted by Vanguard Press. The book's success laid the foundation for his career as a kids's author.

The Second World War and Return to Writing
During World War II, Geisel served in the U.S. Army's Information and Education Division, where he wrote propaganda movies and produced military training cartoons. He was granted the Legion of Merit for his wartime contributions.

After the war, Geisel went back to his profession as a children's author and illustrator. His very first post-war book was "McElligot's Pool" (1947), followed by "Horton Hears a Who!" (1954) and "How the Grinch Stole Christmas!" (1957). These works showcased Geisel's unique blend of humor, rhyme, and innovative characters, which would end up being important to his signature style.

Dr. Seuss and His Impact on Children's Literature
In 1957, Geisel released "The Cat in the Hat", under the pseudonym Dr. Seuss, which marked the start of his most productive and effective duration as an author. The book was composed using only 236 various words, as Geisel sought to produce a more interesting reading experience for young kids. The book's tremendous popularity resulted in the production of Beginner Books, an imprint of Random House that focused on easy-to-read books for children.

Over the course of his profession, Geisel composed and highlighted over 60 books under the name Dr. Seuss, including classics such as "Green Eggs and Ham" (1960), "One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish" (1960), and "Oh, the Places You'll Go!" (1990). These books integrated innovative language and whimsical illustrations to develop memorable stories that have actually captivated generations of children.

His work has actually been translated into more than 20 languages and has actually offered over 600 million copies worldwide.

Personal Life and Later Years
In 1967, Helen Palmer, Geisel's first other half, died after a long struggle with diseases. A year later, Geisel wed Audrey Stone Dimond, a buddy and nurse who assisted him look after Helen.

In the 1970s and 1980s, Geisel continued to write and illustrate books, even as his health began to decrease. He likewise collaborated with filmmakers to adjust his work for television specials, including "How the Grinch Stole Christmas!" (1966) and "The Lorax" (1972).

Dr. Seuss passed away on September 24, 1991, at the age of 87, leaving behind a tradition in children's literature that continues to influence generations of readers.

Legacy and Honors
Dr. Seuss's effect on children's literature appears not just through his book sales however likewise in the various adjustments of his work, consisting of television specials, feature movies, and a Broadway musical. He received various awards and honors during his lifetime, consisting of the Pulitzer Prize, the Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal, and the Regina Medal.

In 1991, the National Education Association developed Read Across America Day in his honor, celebrated each year on his birthday, March 2. In 1995, The Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden was opened in his hometown of Springfield, Massachusetts, as a tribute to the beloved author. The Geisel Library at the University of California, San Diego, where Geisel's archival materials are housed, was called in his honor in 1995.

Dr. Seuss's work has had a long lasting effect on kids's literature and education, remaining popular and pertinent even years after his death. His innovative stories continue to engage the imaginations of both young and old readers and remain a valued part of lots of childhoods.

Our collection contains 22 quotes who is written / told by Seuss, under the main topic Imagination.

Related authors: Lawrence Taylor (Athlete), Tommy Rettig (Actor), Laura Ingalls Wilder (Author)

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22 Famous quotes by Dr. Seuss

Small: Today you are you! That is truer than true! There is no one alive who is you-er than you!
"Today you are you! That is truer than true! There is no one alive who is you-er than you!"
Small: Adults are obsolete children
"Adults are obsolete children"
Small: Youre in pretty good shape for the shape you are in
"You're in pretty good shape for the shape you are in"
Small: A persons a person, no matter how small
"A person's a person, no matter how small"
Small: You know youre in love when you cant fall asleep because reality is finally better than your dreams
"You know you're in love when you can't fall asleep because reality is finally better than your dreams"
Small: You make em, I amuse em
"You make 'em, I amuse 'em"
Small: You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself in any direction you
"You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself in any direction you choose. You're on your own, and you know what you know. And you are the guy who'll decide where to go"
Small: You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room"
Small: When at last we are sure, Youve been properly pilled, Then a few paper forms, Must be properly filled.
"When at last we are sure, You've been properly pilled, Then a few paper forms, Must be properly filled. So that you and your heirs, May be properly billed"
Small: Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. Its not
"Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not"
Small: Today was good. Today was fun. Tomorrow is another one
"Today was good. Today was fun. Tomorrow is another one"
Small: Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh, the thinks you can think up if only you tr
"Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh, the thinks you can think up if only you try!"
Small: Preachers in pulpits talked about what a great message is in the book. No matter what you do, somebody
"Preachers in pulpits talked about what a great message is in the book. No matter what you do, somebody always imputes meaning into your books"
Small: Maybe Christmas, the Grinch thought, doesnt come from a store
"Maybe Christmas, the Grinch thought, doesn't come from a store"
Small: I start drawing, and eventually the characters involve themselves in a situation. Then in the end, I go
"I start drawing, and eventually the characters involve themselves in a situation. Then in the end, I go back and try to cut out most of the preachments"
Small: I meant what I said and I said what I meant
"I meant what I said and I said what I meant"
Small: I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells. Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living, its a way of
"I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells. Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living, it's a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope. Which is what I do, and that enables you to laugh at life's realities"
Small: How did it get so late so soon? Its night before its afternoon. December is here before its June. My go
"How did it get so late so soon? Its night before its afternoon. December is here before its June. My goodness how the time has flewn. How did it get so late so soon?"
Small: Fun is good
"Fun is good"
Small: From there to here, and here to there, funny things are everywhere
"From there to here, and here to there, funny things are everywhere"
Small: Dont cry because its over. Smile because it happened
"Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened"
Small: Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind dont matter and those who matter dont mind
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind"