Francis Wright Biography

Francis Wright, Activist
Born asFrances Wright
Known asFanny Wright
Occup.Activist
FromScotland
BornSeptember 6, 1795
Dundee, Scotland
DiedDecember 13, 1852
Aged57 years
Early Life
Frances Wright, or 'Fanny' as she was fondly known, was born on September 6, 1795, in Dundee, Scotland. She was the daughter of Camilla Campbell and James Wright. The family came from the social and intellectual elite of Scotland, with both her parents supporting human rights and education. At the age of 2, Fanny lost both her parents throughout a check out to London, leaving her and her sis Camilla to be raised by their maternal grandfather and aunt.

Education and Intellectual Development
Frances Wright's education began from an early age under the impact of her grandfather, Gilbert Meason. Due to his progressive ideals, he provided Fredrick a broad-ranging and liberal education, motivating her literary skills, love of learning, and interest in politics. This training created a strong structure for her later advocacy and self-reliance.

In 1820, Wright authored and published her first book, "A Few Days in Athens". The book introduced the philosophy of Epicurus to many readers and showed her rationalist and Enlightenment concepts instilled in her during her early education.

Impact of America and Social Reform
In her twenties, Frances Wright became thinking about the political climate of America. She found solace in the brand-new country, believing that it represented a more egalitarian society filled with chances for everybody. In 1818, she transferred to the United States with her sis Camilla, settling in Cincinnati.

While residing in America, Frances ended up being increasingly concerned about the issue of slavery. In 1821, she released the poem "Altorf" as a criticism of slavery. Following her abolitionist convictions, she started a speculative neighborhood called Nashoba in 1825. Found near Memphis, Tennessee, Nashoba's function was to inform servants and prepare them for their eventual liberty. Sadly, Wright was unable to preserve the neighborhood well. It fell apart in 1830, and the slaves were carried to Haiti, which was an independent Black Republic at the time.

Activism and Public Speaking
Throughout her life, Frances also actively taken part in promoting women's rights, universal suffrage, and religion reform. In 1829, she became the very first female to provide a political speech in the United States. She explored the nation, speaking about her views on abolition, women's education, and social reform.

Among Wright's prominent allies during the period was the popular activist and previous President Thomas Jefferson. He supported her efforts to resolve societal problems, as did William Lloyd Garrison, a noted abolitionist who helped her disperse her works on the topic.

In 1836, Frances Wright married Fran├žois Guillaume D'Arusmont, a French doctor who shared her enthusiasm for social advocacy. The couple had a child, Frances Sylva D'Arusmont. While Wright continued her work advocating for women's rights and social reform, her marriage to D'Arusmont was unhappy, and they eventually divorced in 1852.

Later On Life and Death
Frances Wright dedicated her life to promoting for social reform and defending the rights of the less fortunate. In spite of facing criticism for her extreme concepts and her controversial personal life, she remained dedicated to her causes until completion of her life.

Frances Wright died on December 13, 1852, in Cincinnati, Ohio, leaving behind a tradition of guts, determination, and commitment to progressive perfects. Today, she is remembered as a pioneer, especially as a feminist pioneer and supporter of social reforms in the United States in the early 19th century.

Our collection contains 19 quotes who is written / told by Francis.

Related authors: Thomas Jefferson (President), Epicurus (Philosopher), Philo (Philosopher), William Lloyd Garrison (Journalist), Lawrence Taylor (Athlete), Frances Wright (Writer)

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19 Famous quotes by Francis Wright

Small: We hear of the wealth of nations, of the powers of production, of the demand and supply of markets, and
"We hear of the wealth of nations, of the powers of production, of the demand and supply of markets, and we forget that these words mean no more, if they mean any thing, then the happiness, and the labor, and the necessities of men"
Small: He who lives in the single exercise of his mental faculties, however usefully or curiously directed, is
"He who lives in the single exercise of his mental faculties, however usefully or curiously directed, is equally an imperfect animal with the man who knows only the exercise of muscles"
Small: And when did mere preaching do any good? Put something in the place of these things. Fill the vacuum of
"And when did mere preaching do any good? Put something in the place of these things. Fill the vacuum of the mind"
Small: We have seen that no religion stands on the basis of things known none bounds its horizon within the fi
"We have seen that no religion stands on the basis of things known; none bounds its horizon within the field of human observation; and, therefore, as it can never present us with indisputable facts, so must it ever be at once a source of error and contention"
Small: The existing principle of selfish interest and competition has been carried to its extreme point and, i
"The existing principle of selfish interest and competition has been carried to its extreme point; and, in its progress, has isolated the heart of man, blunted the edge of his finest sensibilities, and annihilated all his most generous impulses and sympathies"
Small: Look into the nature of things. Search out the grounds of your opinions, the for and against
"Look into the nature of things. Search out the grounds of your opinions, the for and against"
Small: Instead of establishing facts, we have to overthrow errors instead of ascertaining what is, we have to
"Instead of establishing facts, we have to overthrow errors; instead of ascertaining what is, we have to chase from our imaginations what is not"
Small: The hired preachers of all sects, creeds, and religions, never do, and never can, teach any thing but w
"The hired preachers of all sects, creeds, and religions, never do, and never can, teach any thing but what is in conformity with the opinions of those who pay them"
Small: Man has been adjudged a social animal
"Man has been adjudged a social animal"
Small: It will appear evident upon attentive consideration that equality of intellectual and physical advantag
"It will appear evident upon attentive consideration that equality of intellectual and physical advantages is the only sure foundation of liberty, and that such equality may best, and perhaps only, be obtained by a union of interests and cooperation in labor"
Small: But while human liberty has engaged the attention of the enlightened, and enlisted the feelings of the
"But while human liberty has engaged the attention of the enlightened, and enlisted the feelings of the generous of all civilized nations, may we not enquire if this liberty has been rightly understood?"
Small: Our religious belief usurps the place of our sensations, our imaginations of our judgment. We no longer
"Our religious belief usurps the place of our sensations, our imaginations of our judgment. We no longer look to actions, trace their consequences, and then deduce the rule; we first make the rule, and then, right or wrong, force the action to square with it"
Small: Awaken its powers, and it will respect itself
"Awaken its powers, and it will respect itself"
Small: Surely it is time to examine into the meaning of words and the nature of things, and to arrive at simpl
"Surely it is time to examine into the meaning of words and the nature of things, and to arrive at simple facts, not received upon the dictum of learned authorities, but upon attentive personal observation of what is passing around us"
Small: The simplest principles become difficult of practice, when habits, formed in error, have been fixed by
"The simplest principles become difficult of practice, when habits, formed in error, have been fixed by time, and the simplest truths hard to receive when prejudice has warped the mind"
Small: Speak of change, and the world is in alarm. And yet where do we not see change?
"Speak of change, and the world is in alarm. And yet where do we not see change?"
Small: Now here is a departure from the first principle of true ethics. Here we find ideas of moral wrong and
"Now here is a departure from the first principle of true ethics. Here we find ideas of moral wrong and moral right associated with something else than beneficial action. The consequent is, we lose sight of the real basis of morals, and substitute a false one"
Small: Know why you believe, understand what you believe, and possess a reason for the faith that is in you
"Know why you believe, understand what you believe, and possess a reason for the faith that is in you"
Small: A necessary consequent of religious belief is the attaching ideas of merit to that belief, and of demer
"A necessary consequent of religious belief is the attaching ideas of merit to that belief, and of demerit to its absence"