Blaise Pascal Biography

Blaise Pascal, Philosopher
Occup.Philosopher
FromFrance
BornJune 19, 1623
Clermont-Ferrand, France
DiedAugust 19, 1662
Paris, France
CauseStomach Cancer
Aged39 years
Blaise Pascal was born upon June 19, 1623, in the French community of Clermont-Ferrand. As a mathematician, physicist, and also creator, Pascal is born in mind for his groundbreaking payments in likelihood concept, hydrodynamics, hydromechanics, and many various other areas. His concepts helped lay the structure for the modern-day computer system, along with considerable advancements in fluid and also air pressure.

Pascal was born to a notable household with honorable family tree. His father, Étienne Pascal, an accomplished mathematician and also tax enthusiast, played a pivotal duty in promoting his child's education and learning. Blaise got a considerable home-school education in maths, physics, as well as the standards. His daddy's links made it feasible for him to engage with significant thinkers, such as Pierre de Fermat, Gilles de Roberval, and also René Descartes.

At just 16, Pascal drafted "Essai put les coniques", a groundbreaking file that delved into the research of conic areas, which established his track record on the planet of maths. In 1642, he invented the initial mechanical calculator, or the Pascaline, to help his father in tax collection. Although not completely sensible, the Pascaline is taken into consideration a very early forefather of modern-day computing devices.

Proceeding his large range of interests, Pascal postulated the principle of pressure in fluid auto mechanics, buoyancy, as well as vacuum cleaner development by experimenting with a barometer. Pascal's experiments gave proof wherefore would certainly later be referred to as the 'Pascal's Law,' which states that stress adjustment experienced by a fluid is transferred undiminished and equally in all directions. Pascal's Law is vital to comprehending hydrodynamics, hydromechanics, as well as the actions of gases under pressure.

Likewise, Pascal made substantial advancements in the realm of probability concept. Through communication with Fermat, both mathematicians changed how scientific research and math came close to issues of opportunity, danger, as well as assumption. Today, their work creates the basis of decision theory and also game concept, which drive calculated decision-making in economics, organization, as well as social sciences.

In his thirties, Pascal experienced an extensive spiritual conversion that led him to join the Catholic sect called Jansenism. His theological works, most notably, "Les Provinciales" and "Pensées", are admired as a few of the most established jobs of French prose. His reflection on the nature of human existence in "Pensées" remains to reverberate with visitors to now.

Pascal's religious devotion spurred him to design the first mass transit system in Paris in the 1660s, focused on supporting the oratory efforts of the Jansenists, as well as efficiently spearheaded the idea of public transit.

Despite his immense payments to a lot of areas-- scientific research, mathematics, faith, and also transportation-- Pascal's wellness was never robust. He dealt with a range of ailments, most likely including consumption, which eventually claimed his life on August 19, 1662, at the young age of 39. His diverse series of accomplishments, breadth of intellect, and also long-term effect on numerous areas make Blaise Pascal one of the most influential French thinkers of the 17th century.

Our collection contains 94 quotes who is written / told by Blaise, under the main topics: Happiness - Faith - Inspirational - Patriotism - Religion.

Related authors: Pierre de Fermat (Lawyer), Lawrence Taylor (Athlete)

Blaise Pascal Famous Works:
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94 Famous quotes by Blaise Pascal

Small: Concupiscence and force are the source of all our actions concupiscence causes voluntary actions, force
"Concupiscence and force are the source of all our actions; concupiscence causes voluntary actions, force involuntary ones"
Small: All of our reasoning ends in surrender to feeling
"All of our reasoning ends in surrender to feeling"
Small: Habit is a second nature that destroys the first. But what is nature? Why is habit not natural? I am ve
"Habit is a second nature that destroys the first. But what is nature? Why is habit not natural? I am very much afraid that nature itself is only a first habit, just as habit is a second nature"
Small: Continuous eloquence wearies. Grandeur must be abandoned to be appreciated. Continuity in everything is
"Continuous eloquence wearies. Grandeur must be abandoned to be appreciated. Continuity in everything is unpleasant. Cold is agreeable, that we may get warm"
Small: Law, without force, is impotent
"Law, without force, is impotent"
Small: If man made himself the first object of study, he would see how incapable he is of going further. How c
"If man made himself the first object of study, he would see how incapable he is of going further. How can a part know the whole?"
Small: Nature is an infinite sphere of which the center is everywhere and the circumference nowhere
"Nature is an infinite sphere of which the center is everywhere and the circumference nowhere"
Small: You always admire what you really dont understand
"You always admire what you really don't understand"
Small: Contradiction is not a sign of falsity, nor the lack of contradiction a sign of truth
"Contradiction is not a sign of falsity, nor the lack of contradiction a sign of truth"
Small: Few friendships would survive if each one knew what his friend says of him behind his back
"Few friendships would survive if each one knew what his friend says of him behind his back"
Small: Faith is different from proof the latter is human, the former is a Gift from God
"Faith is different from proof; the latter is human, the former is a Gift from God"
Small: Faith indeed tells what the senses do not tell, but not the contrary of what they see. It is above them
"Faith indeed tells what the senses do not tell, but not the contrary of what they see. It is above them and not contrary to them"
Small: Faith embraces many truths which seem to contradict each other
"Faith embraces many truths which seem to contradict each other"
Small: Faith certainly tells us what the senses do not, but not the contrary of what they see it is above, not
"Faith certainly tells us what the senses do not, but not the contrary of what they see; it is above, not against them"
Small: All mens miseries derive from not being able to sit in a quiet room alone
"All men's miseries derive from not being able to sit in a quiet room alone"
Small: All human evil comes from a single cause, mans inability to sit still in a room
"All human evil comes from a single cause, man's inability to sit still in a room"
Small: A trifle consoles us, for a trifle distresses us
"A trifle consoles us, for a trifle distresses us"
Small: Chance gives rise to thoughts, and chance removes them no art can keep or acquire them
"Chance gives rise to thoughts, and chance removes them; no art can keep or acquire them"
Small: Can anything be stupider than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of
"Can anything be stupider than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of a river and his ruler has a quarrel with mine, though I have not quarrelled with him?"
Small: Between us and heaven or hell there is only life, which is the frailest thing in the world
"Between us and heaven or hell there is only life, which is the frailest thing in the world"
Small: Belief is a wise wager. Granted that faith cannot be proved, what harm will come to you if you gamble o
"Belief is a wise wager. Granted that faith cannot be proved, what harm will come to you if you gamble on its truth and it proves false? If you gain, you gain all; if you lose, you lose nothing. Wager, then, without hesitation, that He exists"
Small: Atheism shows strength of mind, but only to a certain degree
"Atheism shows strength of mind, but only to a certain degree"
Small: As men are not able to fight against death, misery, ignorance, they have taken it into their heads, in
"As men are not able to fight against death, misery, ignorance, they have taken it into their heads, in order to be happy, not to think of them at all"
Small: Words differently arranged have a different meaning, and meanings differently arranged have different e
"Words differently arranged have a different meaning, and meanings differently arranged have different effects"
Small: When we see a natural style, we are astonished and charmed for we expected to see an author, and we fin
"When we see a natural style, we are astonished and charmed; for we expected to see an author, and we find a person"
Small: When we are in love we seem to ourselves quite different from what we were before
"When we are in love we seem to ourselves quite different from what we were before"
Small: We view things not only from different sides, but with different eyes we have no wish to find them alik
"We view things not only from different sides, but with different eyes; we have no wish to find them alike"
Small: We sail within a vast sphere, ever drifting in uncertainty, driven from end to end
"We sail within a vast sphere, ever drifting in uncertainty, driven from end to end"
Small: We run carelessly to the precipice, after we have put something before us to prevent us seeing it
"We run carelessly to the precipice, after we have put something before us to prevent us seeing it"
Small: We only consult the ear because the heart is wanting
"We only consult the ear because the heart is wanting"
Small: We never love a person, but only qualities
"We never love a person, but only qualities"
Small: To have no time for philosophy is to be a true philosopher
"To have no time for philosophy is to be a true philosopher"
Small: Time heals griefs and quarrels, for we change and are no longer the same persons. Neither the offender
"Time heals griefs and quarrels, for we change and are no longer the same persons. Neither the offender nor the offended are any more themselves"
Small: Thus so wretched is man that he would weary even without any cause for weariness... and so frivolous is
"Thus so wretched is man that he would weary even without any cause for weariness... and so frivolous is he that, though full of a thousand reasons for weariness, the least thing, such as playing billiards or hitting a ball, is sufficient enough to amuse him"
Small: Through space the universe encompasses and swallows me up like an atom through thought I comprehend the
"Through space the universe encompasses and swallows me up like an atom; through thought I comprehend the world"
Small: There is a God shaped vacuum in the heart of every man which cannot be filled by any created thing, but
"There is a God shaped vacuum in the heart of every man which cannot be filled by any created thing, but only by God, the Creator, made known through Jesus"
Small: There are two kinds of people one can call reasonable: those who serve God with all their heart because
"There are two kinds of people one can call reasonable: those who serve God with all their heart because they know him, and those who seek him with all their heart because they do not know him"
Small: There are some who speak well and write badly. For the place and the audience warm them, and draw from
"There are some who speak well and write badly. For the place and the audience warm them, and draw from their minds more than they think of without that warmth"
Small: There are only two kinds of men: the righteous who think they are sinners and the sinners who think the
"There are only two kinds of men: the righteous who think they are sinners and the sinners who think they are righteous"
Small: The weather and my mood have little connection. I have my foggy and my fine days within me my prosperit
"The weather and my mood have little connection. I have my foggy and my fine days within me; my prosperity or misfortune has little to do with the matter"
Small: The supreme function of reason is to show man that some things are beyond reason
"The supreme function of reason is to show man that some things are beyond reason"
Small: The immortality of the soul is a matter which is of so great consequence to us and which touches us so
"The immortality of the soul is a matter which is of so great consequence to us and which touches us so profoundly that we must have lost all feeling to be indifferent about it"
Small: The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing
"The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing"
Small: The greatness of man is great in that he knows himself to be wretched. A tree does not know itself to b
"The greatness of man is great in that he knows himself to be wretched. A tree does not know itself to be wretched"
Small: The greater intellect one has, the more originality one finds in men. Ordinary persons find no differen
"The greater intellect one has, the more originality one finds in men. Ordinary persons find no difference between men"
Small: The gospel to me is simply irresistible
"The gospel to me is simply irresistible"
Small: The finite is annihilated in the presence of the infinite, and becomes a pure nothing. So our spirit be
"The finite is annihilated in the presence of the infinite, and becomes a pure nothing. So our spirit before God, so our justice before divine justice"
Small: The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me
"The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me"
Small: The consciousness of the falsity of present pleasures, and the ignorance of the vanity of absent pleasu
"The consciousness of the falsity of present pleasures, and the ignorance of the vanity of absent pleasures, cause inconstancy"
Small: The charm of fame is so great that we like every object to which it is attached, even death
"The charm of fame is so great that we like every object to which it is attached, even death"
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