Charles Caleb Colton Biography

Charles Caleb Colton, Writer
Known asC.C. Colton
Occup.Writer
FromEngland
BornJanuary 1, 1780
England
DiedJanuary 1, 1832
England
Aged52 years
Early Life and Education
Charles Caleb Colton was born around 1780 in England, though the exact date and place of his birth remain unsure. He was among the kids of the Reverend John Thomas Colton, the vicar of St. Andrew's church in Lyndon, Rutland, and Sarah Mapletoft Colton. He was raised in a spiritual and intellectual family; his parents often encouraged reading and conversation on various topics.

Colton attended Eton College, where he was known for his wit and intelligence amongst his fellow schoolmates. In 1800, he went into King's College, Cambridge, where he continued to excel academically. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1804, followed by his Master of Arts degree in 1807.

Early Career and Ordination
After completing his education, Colton pursued a profession in the church, following in his father's footsteps. He was ordained as a minister of the Church of England and was designated vicar of Kew and Petersham in 1804. He served under the patronage of the Earl of Dysart, who appreciated Colton's intellect and wit.

Colton rapidly got regard and acknowledgment within his community as a preacher and a writer. He published preachings and other religious writings, which were praised for their eloquence and depth of thought. It was during this duration that he likewise started to write literary works such as essays and poems.

Lacon; Or, Many Things in Few Words
In 1820, Colton published his best-known work, "Lacon: Or, Many Things in Few Words", which is a collection of short, powerful aphorisms, insights, and observations culled from his years of reading, preaching, and assessing the human condition. The book proved to be popular among readers and was well-received by critics too. Among its famous quotes is the often-cited maxim, "Imitation is the sincerest kind of flattery".

Some of the key themes in "Lacon" include the relationship between wealth and happiness, the importance of individuality, and the role of knowledge and virtue in influencing human behavior. The book remained popular and influential throughout the 19th century, and it is still remembered today as one of the most substantial works of aphoristic literature in English.

Later On Years and Personal Struggles
Regardless of his success, Colton's life took a dark turn in the 1820s. He battled with financial problems and gambling addiction, which eventually resulted in his resignation from his position as vicar in 1828. To escape his creditors, he got away to France, where he would spend the last years of his life.

While in France, Colton continued to compose and publish deal with numerous topics such as art, travel, and politics. Nevertheless, his personal struggles persisted, and his composing gradually decreased in quality.

Death and Legacy
Charles Caleb Colton's life concerned a tragic end in 1832 when he dedicated suicide in Fontainebleau, France, at the age of 52. His tradition, however, resides on through his prominent aphorisms and observations, which have actually been priced estimate and referenced by numerous authors and thinkers for many years. His contribution to English literature is commemorated for its wit, wisdom, and distinct viewpoint on the human experience.

Our collection contains 70 quotes who is written / told by Charles, under the main topics: Love - Time.

Related authors: Lawrence Taylor (Athlete)

Frequently Asked Questions
  • Q: Charles Caleb Colton imitation
    A: Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, a quote by Charles Caleb Colton highlighting that copying someone's work or actions is a sign of admiration.
  • Q: How old was Charles Caleb Colton?
    A: He became 52 years old
Charles Caleb Colton Famous Works:
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70 Famous quotes by Charles Caleb Colton

Small: In life we shall find many men that are great, and some that are good, but very few men that are both g
"In life we shall find many men that are great, and some that are good, but very few men that are both great and good"
Small: If you cannot inspire a woman with love of you, fill her above the brim with love of herself all that r
"If you cannot inspire a woman with love of you, fill her above the brim with love of herself; all that runs over will be yours"
Small: Corruption is like a ball of snow, once its set a rolling it must increase
"Corruption is like a ball of snow, once it's set a rolling it must increase"
Small: Avarice has ruined more souls than extravagance
"Avarice has ruined more souls than extravagance"
Small: We often pretend to fear what we really despise, and more often despise what we really fear
"We often pretend to fear what we really despise, and more often despise what we really fear"
Small: Power will intoxicate the best hearts, as wine the strongest heads. No man is wise enough, nor good eno
"Power will intoxicate the best hearts, as wine the strongest heads. No man is wise enough, nor good enough to be trusted with unlimited power"
Small: Of present fame think little, and of future less the praises that we receive after we are buried, like
"Of present fame think little, and of future less; the praises that we receive after we are buried, like the flowers that are strewed over our grave, may be gratifying to the living, but they are nothing to the dead"
Small: War kills men, and men deplore the loss but war also crushes bad principles and tyrants, and so saves s
"War kills men, and men deplore the loss; but war also crushes bad principles and tyrants, and so saves societies"
Small: Friendship often ends in love but love in friendship - never
"Friendship often ends in love; but love in friendship - never"
Small: Much may be done in those little shreds and patches of time which every day produces, and which most me
"Much may be done in those little shreds and patches of time which every day produces, and which most men throw away"
Small: To know a man, observe how he wins his object, rather than how he loses it for when we fail, our pride
"To know a man, observe how he wins his object, rather than how he loses it; for when we fail, our pride supports us - when we succeed, it betrays us"
Small: The greatest friend of truth is Time, her greatest enemy is Prejudice, and her constant companion is Hu
"The greatest friend of truth is Time, her greatest enemy is Prejudice, and her constant companion is Humility"
Small: Next to acquiring good friends, the best acquisition is that of good books
"Next to acquiring good friends, the best acquisition is that of good books"
Small: Doubt is the vestibule through which all must pass before they can enter into the temple of wisdom
"Doubt is the vestibule through which all must pass before they can enter into the temple of wisdom"
Small: Death is the liberator of him whom freedom cannot release, the physician of him whom medicine cannot cu
"Death is the liberator of him whom freedom cannot release, the physician of him whom medicine cannot cure, and the comforter of him whom time cannot console"
Small: Books, like friends, should be few and well chosen. Like friends, too, we should return to them again a
"Books, like friends, should be few and well chosen. Like friends, too, we should return to them again and again for, like true friends, they will never fail us - never cease to instruct - never cloy"
Small: Life isnt like a book. Life isnt logical or sensible or orderly. Life is a mess most of the time. And t
"Life isn't like a book. Life isn't logical or sensible or orderly. Life is a mess most of the time. And theology must be lived in the midst of that mess"
Small: Knowledge is two-fold, and consists not only in an affirmation of what is true, but in the negation of
"Knowledge is two-fold, and consists not only in an affirmation of what is true, but in the negation of that which is false"
Small: Happiness, that grand mistress of the ceremonies in the dance of life, impels us through all its mazes
"Happiness, that grand mistress of the ceremonies in the dance of life, impels us through all its mazes and meanderings, but leads none of us by the same route"
Small: If a horse has four legs, and Im riding it, I think I can win
"If a horse has four legs, and I'm riding it, I think I can win"
Small: Im aiming by the time Im fifty to stop being an adolescent
"I'm aiming by the time I'm fifty to stop being an adolescent"
Small: Friendship, of itself a holy tie, is made more sacred by adversity
"Friendship, of itself a holy tie, is made more sacred by adversity"
Small: Contemporaries appreciate the person rather than their merit, posterity will regard the merit rather th
"Contemporaries appreciate the person rather than their merit, posterity will regard the merit rather than the person"
Small: Constant success shows us but one side of the world adversity brings out the reverse of the picture
"Constant success shows us but one side of the world; adversity brings out the reverse of the picture"
Small: We hate some persons because we do not know them and will not know them because we hate them
"We hate some persons because we do not know them; and will not know them because we hate them"
Small: There is this difference between happiness and wisdom: he that thinks himself the happiest man, really
"There is this difference between happiness and wisdom: he that thinks himself the happiest man, really is so; but he that thinks himself the wisest, is generally the greatest fool"
Small: The first requisite for success is the ability to apply your physical and mental energies to one proble
"The first requisite for success is the ability to apply your physical and mental energies to one problem incessantly without growing weary"
Small: Our incomes should be like our shoes if too small, they will gall and pinch us but if too large, they w
"Our incomes should be like our shoes; if too small, they will gall and pinch us; but if too large, they will cause us to stumble and to trip"
Small: None are so fond of secrets as those who do not mean to keep them
"None are so fond of secrets as those who do not mean to keep them"
Small: There are three difficulties in authorship: to write anything worth publishing, to find honest men to p
"There are three difficulties in authorship: to write anything worth publishing, to find honest men to publish it, and to find sensible men to read it"
Small: Mystery is not profoundness
"Mystery is not profoundness"
Small: Liberty will not descend to a people a people must raise themselves to liberty it is a blessing that mu
"Liberty will not descend to a people; a people must raise themselves to liberty; it is a blessing that must be earned before it can be enjoyed"
Small: Justice to my readers compels me to admit that I write because I have nothing to do justice to myself i
"Justice to my readers compels me to admit that I write because I have nothing to do; justice to myself induces me to add that I will cease to write the moment I have nothing to say"
Small: Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery
"Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery"
Small: If you would be known, and not know, vegetate in a village if you would know, and not be known, live in
"If you would be known, and not know, vegetate in a village; if you would know, and not be known, live in a city"
Small: He who studies books alone will know how things ought to be, and he who studies men will know how they
"He who studies books alone will know how things ought to be, and he who studies men will know how they are"
Small: Examinations are formidable even to the best prepared, for the greatest fool may ask more than the wise
"Examinations are formidable even to the best prepared, for the greatest fool may ask more than the wisest man can answer"
Small: There is nothing more imprudent than excessive prudence
"There is nothing more imprudent than excessive prudence"
Small: There are some frauds so well conducted that it would be stupidity not to be deceived by them
"There are some frauds so well conducted that it would be stupidity not to be deceived by them"
Small: No company is preferable to bad. We are more apt to catch the vices of others than virtues, as disease
"No company is preferable to bad. We are more apt to catch the vices of others than virtues, as disease is far more contagious than health"
Small: It is always safe to learn, even from our enemies seldom safe to venture to instruct, even our friends
"It is always safe to learn, even from our enemies; seldom safe to venture to instruct, even our friends"
Small: He that knows himself, knows others and he that is ignorant of himself, could not write a very profound
"He that knows himself, knows others; and he that is ignorant of himself, could not write a very profound lecture on other men's heads"
Small: We ask advice, but we mean approbation
"We ask advice, but we mean approbation"
Small: The present time has one advantage over every other - it is our own
"The present time has one advantage over every other - it is our own"
Small: When you have nothing to say, say nothing
"When you have nothing to say, say nothing"
Small: We own almost all our knowledge not to those who have agreed but to those who have differed
"We own almost all our knowledge not to those who have agreed but to those who have differed"
Small: True contentment depends not upon what we have a tub was large enough for Diogenes, but a world was too
"True contentment depends not upon what we have; a tub was large enough for Diogenes, but a world was too little for Alexander"
Small: The mistakes of the fool are known to the world, but not to himself. The mistakes of the wise man are k
"The mistakes of the fool are known to the world, but not to himself. The mistakes of the wise man are known to himself, but not to the world"
Small: Many books require no thought from those who read them, and for a very simple reason they made no such
"Many books require no thought from those who read them, and for a very simple reason; they made no such demand upon those who wrote them"
Small: Did universal charity prevail, earth would be a heaven, and hell a fable
"Did universal charity prevail, earth would be a heaven, and hell a fable"
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