William Hazlitt Biography

William Hazlitt, Critic
Occup.Critic
FromEngland
BornApril 10, 1778
England
DiedSeptember 18, 1830
London, England
CauseStroke
Aged52 years
William Hazlitt was a significant English essayist, critic, and theorist who was born upon April 10, 1778, in Maidstone, Kent, and also died on September 18, 1830, in London. As a writer, he was known for his astute monitorings, sharp wit, as well as substantial breadth of expertise. His job stays very concerned for the depth as well as candor of his ideas, as well as his impact on the Romantic period of British literature.

Hazlitt's father, William Hazlitt Sr., was a Unitarian priest that substantially influenced his son's intellectual childhood. In 1783, the household moved to Ireland, where Hazlitt went to the Unitarian College in Hackney, near London, from 1793 to 1794, planning to follow in his papa's footprints. Nonetheless, he soon abandoned this course and picked to pursue painting as his career. Hazlitt apprenticed as a portrait painter for a brief period prior to transferring to Paris in 1798, where he had a chance to research as well as duplicate masterpieces in the Louvre.

While he attained some success as a painter, Hazlitt's true passion stocked composing. He started adding to regulars, with his first work titled "An Essay on the Principles of Human Action", released in 1805. In this piece, Hazlitt aimed to refute the egoistic theories of human activity, advocating for a more humane method to comprehending human behavior.

In 1808, Hazlitt married Sarah Stoddart, sister of the political reporter John Stoddart. The marital relationship proved to be turbulent, with his spouse's extramarital relations as well as their conflict leading to their separation. The couple had 3 youngsters, just one of whom, William, endured to the adult years.

Throughout his job, Hazlitt was an energetic contributor to various periodicals, consisting of The Morning Chronicle, The Edinburgh Review, and The Examiner. He also released various service literary objection, such as "Characters of Shakespeare's Plays" (1817), "Lectures on the English Poets" (1818), "Lectures on the English Comic Writers" (1819), "Table-Talk" (1821-22), and "The Spirit of the Age" (1825). In these works, Hazlitt developed himself as one of one of the most fantastic doubters of his time, using one-of-a-kind understandings right into the jobs of different writers, such as William Shakespeare, John Milton, as well as Samuel Johnson.

Throughout his life time, Hazlitt faced significant individual and financial struggles, typically aggravated by his tendency for severe objection, which estranged many successful individuals in British society. In spite of the troubles he encountered, Hazlitt remained to generate revolutionary job, as well as his impact persisted in the world of literary and social objection.

Hazlitt spent considerable time in the firm of notable figures of the time, such as Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth, Charles Lamb, as well as Percy Bysshe Shelley. He usually revealed his adoration and also regard for these writers, even though he ultimately parted ways with Coleridge as well as Wordsworth, largely because of political differences.

William Hazlitt's death in 1830 noted the loss of a recognized critic, essayist, as well as theorist. His payments to the world of literary works not only shaped the Romantic period but also remain to influence as well as prompt the ideas of readers today.

Our collection contains 93 quotes who is written / told by William, under the main topics: Words of Wisdom - Travel.

Related authors: William Shakespeare (Dramatist), Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Poet), Sydney Smith (Clergyman), Samuel Johnson (Author), Thomas Hood (Poet), Charles Lamb (Critic), William Wordsworth (Poet), John Milton (Poet), Lawrence Taylor (Athlete), Percy Bysshe Shelley (Poet)

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93 Famous quotes by William Hazlitt

Small: The seat of knowledge is in the head, of wisdom, in the heart
"The seat of knowledge is in the head, of wisdom, in the heart"
Small: Man is a make-believe animal: he is never so truly himself as when he is acting a part
"Man is a make-believe animal: he is never so truly himself as when he is acting a part"
Small: Everything is in motion. Everything flows. Everything is vibrating
"Everything is in motion. Everything flows. Everything is vibrating"
Small: Every man, in his own opinion, forms an exception to the ordinary rules of morality
"Every man, in his own opinion, forms an exception to the ordinary rules of morality"
Small: Great thoughts reduced to practice become great acts
"Great thoughts reduced to practice become great acts"
Small: You know more of a road by having traveled it than by all the conjectures and descriptions in the world
"You know more of a road by having traveled it than by all the conjectures and descriptions in the world"
Small: The seat of knowledge is in the head of wisdom, in the heart. We are sure to judge wrong, if we do not
"The seat of knowledge is in the head; of wisdom, in the heart. We are sure to judge wrong, if we do not feel right"
Small: An honest man speaks the truth, though it may give offence a vain man, in order that it may
"An honest man speaks the truth, though it may give offence; a vain man, in order that it may"
Small: Satirists gain the applause of others through fear, not through love
"Satirists gain the applause of others through fear, not through love"
Small: Look up, laugh loud, talk big, keep the color in your cheek and the fire in your eye, adorn your person
"Look up, laugh loud, talk big, keep the color in your cheek and the fire in your eye, adorn your person, maintain your health, your beauty and your animal spirits"
Small: It is hard for any one to be an honest politician who is not born and bred a Dissenter
"It is hard for any one to be an honest politician who is not born and bred a Dissenter"
Small: Gracefulness has been defined to be the outward expression of the inward harmony of the soul
"Gracefulness has been defined to be the outward expression of the inward harmony of the soul"
Small: Envy among other ingredients has a mixture of the love of justice in it. We are more angry at undeserve
"Envy among other ingredients has a mixture of the love of justice in it. We are more angry at undeserved than at deserved good-fortune"
Small: As is our confidence, so is our capacity
"As is our confidence, so is our capacity"
Small: Zeal will do more than knowledge
"Zeal will do more than knowledge"
Small: Without the aid of prejudice and custom, I should not be able to find my way across the room
"Without the aid of prejudice and custom, I should not be able to find my way across the room"
Small: We often choose a friend as we do a mistress - for no particular excellence in themselves, but merely f
"We often choose a friend as we do a mistress - for no particular excellence in themselves, but merely from some circumstance that flatters our self-love"
Small: To think ill of mankind and not wish ill to them, is perhaps the highest wisdom and virtue
"To think ill of mankind and not wish ill to them, is perhaps the highest wisdom and virtue"
Small: Prejudice is the child of ignorance
"Prejudice is the child of ignorance"
Small: Love turns, with a little indulgence, to indifference or disgust hatred alone is immortal
"Love turns, with a little indulgence, to indifference or disgust; hatred alone is immortal"
Small: Even in the common affairs of life, in love, friendship, and marriage, how little security have we when
"Even in the common affairs of life, in love, friendship, and marriage, how little security have we when we trust our happiness in the hands of others!"
Small: Dr. Johnson was a lazy learned man who liked to think and talk better than to read or write who, howeve
"Dr. Johnson was a lazy learned man who liked to think and talk better than to read or write; who, however, wrote much and well, but too often by rote"
Small: Cunning is the art of concealing our own defects, and discovering other peoples weaknesses
"Cunning is the art of concealing our own defects, and discovering other people's weaknesses"
Small: Anyone who has passed though the regular gradations of a classical education, and is not made a fool by
"Anyone who has passed though the regular gradations of a classical education, and is not made a fool by it, may consider himself as having had a very narrow escape"
Small: To be remembered after we are dead, is but poor recompense for being treated with contempt while we are
"To be remembered after we are dead, is but poor recompense for being treated with contempt while we are living"
Small: The soul of a journey is liberty, perfect liberty, to think, feel, do just as one pleases
"The soul of a journey is liberty, perfect liberty, to think, feel, do just as one pleases"
Small: The only vice that cannot be forgiven is hypocrisy. The repentance of a hypocrite is itself hypocrisy
"The only vice that cannot be forgiven is hypocrisy. The repentance of a hypocrite is itself hypocrisy"
Small: The art of pleasing consists in being pleased
"The art of pleasing consists in being pleased"
Small: Rules and models destroy genius and art
"Rules and models destroy genius and art"
Small: One shining quality lends a lustre to another, or hides some glaring defect
"One shining quality lends a lustre to another, or hides some glaring defect"
Small: Man is the only animal that laughs and weeps for he is the only animal that is struck with the differen
"Man is the only animal that laughs and weeps; for he is the only animal that is struck with the difference between what things are, and what they ought to be"
Small: Few things tend more to alienate friendship than a want of punctuality in our engagements. I have known
"Few things tend more to alienate friendship than a want of punctuality in our engagements. I have known the breach of a promise to dine or sup to break up more than one intimacy"
Small: Dandyism is a variety of genius
"Dandyism is a variety of genius"
Small: Almost every sect of Christianity is a perversion of its essence, to accommodate it to the prejudices o
"Almost every sect of Christianity is a perversion of its essence, to accommodate it to the prejudices of the world"
Small: Wit is the salt of conversation, not the food
"Wit is the salt of conversation, not the food"
Small: When a thing ceases to be a subject of controversy, it ceases to be a subject of interest
"When a thing ceases to be a subject of controversy, it ceases to be a subject of interest"
Small: To be happy, we must be true to nature and carry our age along with us
"To be happy, we must be true to nature and carry our age along with us"
Small: To a superior race of being the pretensions of mankind to extraordinary sanctity and virtue must seem..
"To a superior race of being the pretensions of mankind to extraordinary sanctity and virtue must seem... ridiculous"
Small: Those who make their dress a principal part of themselves, will, in general, become of no more value th
"Those who make their dress a principal part of themselves, will, in general, become of no more value than their dress"
Small: Those who are at war with others are not at peace with themselves
"Those who are at war with others are not at peace with themselves"
Small: The true barbarian is he who thinks everything barbarous but his own tastes and prejudices
"The true barbarian is he who thinks everything barbarous but his own tastes and prejudices"
Small: The most insignificant people are the most apt to sneer at others. They are safe from reprisals.
"The most insignificant people are the most apt to sneer at others. They are safe from reprisals. And have no hope of rising in their own self esteem but by lowering their neighbors"
Small: The humblest painter is a true scholar and the best of scholars the scholar of nature
"The humblest painter is a true scholar; and the best of scholars the scholar of nature"
Small: Life is the art of being well deceived and in order that the deception may succeed it must be habitual
"Life is the art of being well deceived; and in order that the deception may succeed it must be habitual and uninterrupted"
Small: If the world were good for nothing else, it is a fine subject for speculation
"If the world were good for nothing else, it is a fine subject for speculation"
Small: Grace is the absence of everything that indicates pain or difficulty, hesitation or incongruity
"Grace is the absence of everything that indicates pain or difficulty, hesitation or incongruity"
Small: Grace in women has more effect than beauty
"Grace in women has more effect than beauty"
Small: Good temper is one of the greatest preservers of the features
"Good temper is one of the greatest preservers of the features"
Small: A scholar is like a book written in a dead language. It is not every one that can read in it
"A scholar is like a book written in a dead language. It is not every one that can read in it"
Small: A hair in the head is worth two in the brush
"A hair in the head is worth two in the brush"
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